Do not attempt this quiz while driving. If you haven’t digested the first chapter in this series, you might want to do that first.

Even if you’ve watched all the videos, it’s not the same as really soaking up a still – with a crib sheet in the mix – and resting your eyes on some details. Click on any image to launch a Slideshow.

 

 

 

Level 1: Focus Attention

 

Level 2: Load Working Memory

 

Level 3: Strengthen Recall-Ability

 

Next up: Bean Bags, Acronyms, Finger Tapping and Leonardo’s Map of Imola! We’re going to make awesome Codebreakers out of you yet.

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13 thoughts on “The French Chateau

  • April 28, 2017 at 1:08 pm
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    That’s it! The guy in green, Patron Saint of Spain, has got to be the King of Naples – who’s just been told that the King of France is on his way to run him out of house and home.

    And the King of France is undoubtedly in those 30 pieces of silver.




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    • April 28, 2017 at 4:54 pm
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      In keeping with the algebra, the guy in the middle of the threesome on the right hand of Jesus (St.Peter), as opposed to the Spaniard on the left hand of Jesus (St. James, Patron Saint of Spain), is also a Spaniard. Rodrigo Borgia was Pope from August 1492 to August 1503.




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      • April 28, 2017 at 5:09 pm
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        Meanwhile, the “old” King of Naples had just died – on 25 January 1494. His son succeeded him for a year before running for his life and dying in a monastery 23 January 1495.

        When did the French show up? February 1495!

        How convenient.




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        • April 28, 2017 at 5:11 pm
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          Welcome to Bletchley Park.

          🙂




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        • April 28, 2017 at 5:32 pm
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          You KNOW this is all making it back to Milan. Poor Guy in Green/King of Naples. He is definitely looking at that empty plate — in front of Jesus – in horror.




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          • April 28, 2017 at 5:37 pm
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            Where have we seen that plate before? 6th century Ravenna




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  • April 28, 2017 at 1:15 pm
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    If St. John is the Survivor Saint – odds are that’s a self-portrait. The portrait by Ingres in the featured image was probably based on the red chalk drawing famously thought to be a self-portrait, but I’ve heard it convincingly argued that that portrait is actually of Leonardo’s father.




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  • April 28, 2017 at 1:17 pm
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    That’s certainly a very long arm that Leonardo’s sporting then.




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  • April 28, 2017 at 1:26 pm
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    Interesting juxtaposition of The Italian Wars with World War II. It’s probably worth noting here also that the Fall of Constantinople (1453) probably precipitated the implosion of the Medici Bank. Lorenzo’s whole life must have been about trying to keep his grandfather’s ship afloat.

    He probably actually died of a heart attack when he heard the Spaniards had just discovered a short cut to India. That could quite have been a last straw for the Italian Peninsula’s grossly inflated profit margins.

    On top of that weird Savonarola exploit to boot. Phew!




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  • April 28, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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    Granada capitulated on January 2, 1492.

    Ferdinand & Isabella launched their giant ethnic cleansing project on 31 March 1492.

    Lorenzo died April 8, 1492.

    Columbus left for The New World August 3, 1492.

    So probably when they started driving out all of Spain’s Jews they appropriated their assets and what Lorenzo got was a little note saying, “Columbus just got fully funded”.




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  • April 28, 2017 at 2:04 pm
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    You never know what you can ask Google:

    For ships in 1492, 4 knots was typical and 8 knots was top speed. Distance from the Istanbul to Spain is about 1774 nautical miles. At 4 knots, this is about 19 days of travel. From Barcelona to Genoa its only 383 nautical miles. Factoring for overland travel at top speed, that’s what? 5 days? 6? 7?




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  • October 16, 2017 at 8:37 am
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    wow…that glimpse of a partially cleaned painting is sticking with me…nice, nice, nice.




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